How to Get Jet Charter Into Corporate Travel

January 31, 2018

Business Travel

Business Travel

How to Get Jet Charter Into Corporate Travel

Most CFO’s of businesses take the productivity factor into consideration when deciding what contributions employees make to the organization. The more money you make as an employee, the higher your productivity factor is and if you are only covering your salary, chances are the company will let you go.

Over 80% of all business trips taken last year in the U.S. were regional and 80% again of those trips were taken by car. Averaging two to four hundred miles driven one way. Everyone knows that spending an entire day in a car traveling on company time is not productive or cost effective, and especially if the people taking these road trips are making salaries in the six figures.

We all despise the delays and cancellations of commercial air travel. It is a topic that is discussed a lot and we hear jet charter sales people talking about it all the time.

We too, have all heard the pitch that jet charter is more flexible, convenient and more productive. This talk alone does nothing to convince the CFOs to justify it, however. What they are looking at is the cost. The jet charter trip proposals have low closing ratios while the car and commercial airline closing ratios are high. Is it possible to present a quantitative argument to promote jet charter service that highlights the flexibility, convenience, productivity and time to equal a true cost? Try to develop a cost/productivity ROI equation to convince the CFO that using a jet charter service is a worthy expense.

CFO’s must be presented with a new way to think about time, and by their nature they are very objective in their reasoning. Using numbers to show the huge difference between the perceived cost and the realized savings when a valued employee’s productivity factor could help persuade a a company’s money manager that private jet travel is worthwhile.

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